Redefine Your Career!

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Idea Behind the Blog!

“Don’t call us, we’ll call you”. The dreaded, much feared, and probably the last words any candidate would want to hear after an interview. If you’re fed up of scanning millions of job portals, going for innumerable interviews, and still have been shown the door by employers galore, then you sure have enough reason to get a career-strategy makeover as soon as possible. Here’s how you can help redefine your career !! BEST OF LUCK!!

Career Funda !!

Whether you’re new on the job scene, fresh out of college, or even an old-timer who wants to boost your career, you can find the best and most practical advice on this site. You are provided with handy tips that can help promote your career. It also ensures you get freedom in making a decision to select a job you will absolutely love to do!

Understand Hiring / recruitment cycle


When it comes to connecting with the right job opportunity, timing isn't everything, but it's certainly something. Tuning into industries' and employers' annual recruitment cycles just might give you a decisive edge.

That's the consensus of recruiters and employers with fingers on the pulse of seasonal variations in hiring. Here's a quarter-by-quarter summary of how these hiring dynamics play out.

First Quarter: A New Year's Wave of Hiring

Sometimes peaks of hiring correspond with workplace factors that are only loosely related, like when people take vacation. "Hiring seems to be done by consensus more than any other decision," says Scott Testa, chief operating officer of Mindbridge Software in Norristown, Pennsylvania. "So most hiring decisions have to be made when people are in the office."

Major hiring initiatives may follow close on the heels of the holidays and summer. "The big months for hiring are January and February, and late September and October," says Testa. "Job seekers who make contact right at the start of these cycles have the best chance of being hired."

Strong hiring periods like the first quarter, when demand for talent may outweigh the supply of qualified candidates, may be a good time to go for a job with more responsibility or higher pay. "If you're currently employed and looking to improve your status, you'll want to look during the peak hiring season," says Glenn Smith, president of search firm Precise Strategies in O'Fallon, Illinois.

Second Quarter: Gearing Up for Summer

For those whose livelihood depends substantially on fair weather, spring is when hiring peaks. In the construction industry, hiring in April, May and June proceeds at double the pace of December, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS).

Tourism and hospitality hiring is also very strong in the spring. And businesses looking to hire professional workers before fall often do so now, before key decision makers start rotating out for summer vacation.

Third Quarter: Recruiters Relax a Bit, and Vacation Plays a Role

Hiring slows down in July before picking up at the end of August. For those with nontraditional but impressive employment backgrounds, there's an advantage to looking in relatively slow hiring months like July and December, says Smith.

For example, recruiters, less pressed for time than in peak months, may be willing to take a longer look at an experienced professional woman seeking to return to work after taking years off to care for children.

Fourth Quarter: A Rush, Then a Lull

The fourth quarter presents the most complex hiring dynamics of the year, with its mix of fall activity, holiday retail hiring, Thanksgiving-to-New Year's slowdown, and end-of-year financial and budget maneuvering.

"Hiring managers and bank CEOs will typically try to reduce their operating profits by incurring search fees towards the end of each year, to avoid paying taxes," says Josiah Whitman, an executive recruiter with Financial Placements of Lake Oswego, Oregon. His firm's job orders are distributed this way: first quarter, 23 percent; second quarter, 21 percent; third quarter, 20 percent; fourth quarter, 36 percent.

Although December hiring is at low levels in many industries, recruiters are determined to fill the year's remaining openings by December 31, and the supply of applicants dwindles as Christmas and the new year approach.

Major industries classified as information, financial services, and professional and business services, having hired heavily in the second quarter, see their lowest level of hiring in December, says JOLTS.

But December isn't as slow as it used to be, say some observers. And applications tend to slow down during the holiday season more than openings do -- tipping the balance in favour of those who do apply.

"It seems that business just keeps going through the holidays," says John Challenger, CEO of outplacement and search firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas in Chicago. "There doesn't seem to be the kind of letup that there used to be."

So playing the recruitment peaks doesn't mean waiting out the rest of the year. "You need to be out there looking for opportunities, not finding excuses to avoid looking," says Tom Johnston, CEO of Search Path International in Cleveland.

Enhance your interview skill in 2010


Even the smartest and most qualified job seekers need to prepare for job interviews. Why, you ask? Interviewing is a learned skill, and there are no second chances to make a great first impression. So study these 10 strategies to enhance your interview skills.

Practice Good Nonverbal Communication

It's about demonstrating confidence: standing straight, making eye contact and connecting with a good, firm handshake. That first nonverbal impression can be a great beginning -- or quick ending -- to your interview.

Dress for the Job or Company

Today's casual dress codes do not give you permission to dress as "they" do when you interview. It is important to look professional and well-groomed. Whether you wear a suit or something less formal depends on the company culture and the position you are seeking. If possible, call to find out about the company dress code before the interview.


From the very beginning of the interview, your interviewer is giving you information, either directly or indirectly. If you are not hearing it, you are missing a major opportunity. Good communication skills include listening and letting the person know you heard what was said. Observe your interviewer, and match that style and pace.

Don't Talk Too Much

Telling the interviewer more than he needs to know could be a fatal mistake. When you have not prepared ahead of time, you may tend to ramble, sometimes talking yourself right out of the job. Prepare for the interview by reading through the job posting, matching your skills with the position's requirements and relating only that information.

Don't Be Too Familiar

The interview is a professional meeting to talk business. This is not about making a new friend. Your level of familiarity should mimic the interviewer's demeanor. It is important to bring energy and enthusiasm to the interview and to ask questions, but do not overstep your place as a candidate looking for a job.

Use Appropriate Language

It's a given that you should use professional language during the interview. Be aware of any inappropriate slang words or references to age, race, religion, politics or sexual orientation -- these topics could send you out the door very quickly.

Don't Be Cocky

Attitude plays a key role in your interview success. There is a fine balance between confidence, professionalism and modesty. Even if you're putting on a performance to demonstrate your ability, overconfidence is as bad, if not worse, as being too reserved.

Take Care to Answer the Questions

When an interviewer asks for an example of a time when you did something, he is seeking a sample of your past behavior. If you fail to relate a specific example, you not only don't answer the question, but you also miss an opportunity to prove your ability and talk about your skills.

Ask Questions

When asked if they have any questions, most candidates answer, "No." Wrong answer. Part of knowing how to interview is being ready to ask questions to demonstrate an interest in what goes on in the company. Asking questions also gives you the opportunity to find out if this is the right place for you. The best questions come from listening to what you're asked during the interview and asking for additional information.

Don't Appear Desperate

When you interview with the "please, please hire me" approach, you appear desperate and less confident. Maintain the three C's during the interview: cool, calm and confident. You know you can do the job; make sure the interviewer believes you can, too.

Resume Enhancement tips for 2010

A resume refresher doesn't need to be painful. And your efforts could pay off with big dividends. Arm yourself with an updated, high-octane resume, and this could be the year that you land a better job.

Now is a great time to reflect on your recent accomplishments and add them to your resume. Let these ideas guide you.

Find Your Passion

Make sure your resume instantly communicates your career target with a descriptive headline (e.g., "CPA Backed by Corporate Audit Experience") and adequately reflects your depth and breadth of experience in a brief, hard-hitting opening objective highlighting your top selling points.

If you're thinking about changing careers or industries, be sure you've clearly defined your goal. Your job search will be more successful if your resume targets a specific field instead of being a one-size-fits-all document. Research positions to gain a solid understanding of what you want to do as well as the qualifications employers are seeking. Once you identify your career target, assess your background and identify transferable skills and experience that will enable success. Add a resume objective that spells out your goals and shows the relevance of past experience. For example: "Award-winning educator seeking to leverage five years of teaching experience to transition into corporate training."

Add New Employment, Skills and Accomplishments

Refreshing your resume also means keeping it current. If you've changed jobs during the past year, earned a promotion or expanded responsibilities, your resume should reflect this. Even if you've remained in the same position, you've probably achieved noteworthy accomplishments in the last year.

Keep Keywords Up-to-Date

Industry-specific jargon, buzzwords and technology keep changing, and your resume should be rich with these keywords.

Include New Professional Activities

Add professional-development activities you completed last year, including certificates, degrees, courses and in-service training. Also include professional organizations you've joined and industry conferences you've attended. List training programs you've begun, even if you haven't completed them. This shows your commitment to ongoing professional development.

Edit Ruthlessly

As you add new information to your resume, also consider the usefulness of older or less relevant experience. This will ensure your resume doesn't become unwieldy. Unless you want to return to a former career, decrease the amount of detail you provide for older experience. For job seekers with 10 years of experience or more, this may mean setting up an Early Career section, where you briefly summarize employers, job titles and employment dates. Other expendable items include obsolete technology and your high school diploma once you've earned a college degree.

Proofread your resume carefully to ensure it's error-free. Watch for information that needs to be updated from previous versions. For example, if your old resume included a summary that stated your years of experience, increase this number if necessary.

Start a Kudos File

Resolve to start a file for projects and successes you achieve during the year. Copy performance reviews and keep them in this file. Print out complimentary or congratulatory emails and file these away. List new committees you join. Jot down assignments you complete during the year. Include details of quantifiable results (e.g., percentages, dollar amounts, before/after comparisons) of your efforts while still fresh in your mind. Your kudos file will remind you where you excelled so you'll be ready to punch up your resume.

Update Regularly

You should refresh your resume throughout the year, not just at the beginning. You never know when opportunity may come knocking.

How to Enhance your job search in 2010?

You've been searching for a new job for the past six months, but you can't seem to find the right fit. With the new year, maybe it's time to throw out your old approach and try something different. Get started with these strategies.

Set Realistic Expectations

Setting realistic career expectations is key to conducting a successful job search. If you are not seasoned in your field of choice, look for positions that will let you broaden your skills. You may not secure that management job this time, but you will be well-positioned for future opportunities.

Review Your Resume

Your resume may not be attracting the right attention, and it could be time to spiff it up a bit. Ask someone to critique your resume, and be open to their suggestions. .

Reevaluate Your Approach

Looking for a job is a full-time job in itself. If you are dedicating a few hours a week to your job search, consider stepping up your efforts.

Reevaluate Your Situation

If you are employed and seeking greener pastures, reassess your situation. Now that you've had a chance to look around, you might decide things are not that bad where you are.

Take a Break

It may sound simple, but sometimes what you really need is to get away from the stress of job searching. If you can afford to, give yourself permission to take a week or two off. You will be surprised how your outlook can change.
Sometimes all it takes is a little adjustment for things to click. Be open to making some changes in your job search strategy, and before you know it, you will be the one dispensing job search advice.

Stuck in wrong career? : Know how to do fresh start

What do you need to do to find the kind of enjoyment or progress you want in your career? Joel Garfinkle, founder of Dream Job Coaching, a consulting firm specializing in personal fulfillment and professional transformation based in Oakland, California, offers these suggestions.

Determine Which Aspects of Your Job You Like

Then find a way to do more of whatever that is. When you are engrossed in a project you like, your workday will be energizing rather than draining. You may also find that the tasks you enjoy are the same ones a coworker or boss dislikes. Find out if you can work out a win-win situation.

Learn from the Best Around You

Who in your office seems to really enjoy -- and excel -- at their work? What can you learn from them? People who like coming to work radiate positive energy, and their spirit can be infectious. Let the energy rub off on you.

Determine Your Career Signature

If you had to write down one statement that would encompass who you are (or want to be) professionally and personally, what would it say? Take some time to clarify your unique signature, and use this statement as a guiding force in pursuing what you want to do and whom you want to be.

Recognize What You Can and Cannot Control

Write down the things that stress you out at work. Circle the ones you have control over, and cross out the ones you don't. Vow to stop spending energy on the crossed-out items; redirect your energy on finding solutions to the problems you can change.

Do the Job Above Your Current Position

Offer to take on some of the responsibilities in the position just above you. Becoming familiar with that role makes you an obvious choice for future promotion.

Accomplish Projects That Directly Affect Your Resume

When taking on new projects, try to select those that will most likely benefit you. Be sure to quantify the results of your work and add these accomplishments to your resume, which you should be updating regularly.

Cultivate Friendships at Work

Your coworkers can understand and appreciate what life is like in your office better than anyone else. Take the time to develop friendly relationships with them. You'll benefit personally and professionally from the time you invest in getting to know them.

See the Big Picture and the Little Pictures

What is the big picture -- your overall vision -- for your professional life? Now what are the small daily steps or little pictures that will get you there? Make a small goal, like joining a professional organization or finding a mentor -- something you can accomplish today.

Make Sure You're on the Right Path

Are you really doing what you want to do? Does what you think you should be doing interfere with what you want to be doing? None of the above suggestions will work if your career isn't aligned with your true interests, personality traits and natural abilities. If a career assessment is in order, make this your first priority.

Top 10 career resolutions for year 2010


Like the old saying, "Today is the first day of the rest of your life," it's never a bad time to start moving your career in a better direction. Here are 10 New Year's resolutions to help.

Pay Attention in Class

Treat every workday like a school day. Be sure you learn something and use it to make yourself more productive. It doesn't have to relate to your skills set. It may be as simple as understanding how to work with specific peers or emotional intelligence. Take mental notes. Don't sleepwalk through the day.

Look for the Next Rung

You need to excel at your job. This is how you gain credibility. But understanding your next step is key to career happiness. Career pathing is critical to remaining engaged on the job. Schedule discussions with your manager to get clarity on the next challenge. If you don't get it on your team or in your company, it may be time to look elsewhere.

Understand Company Goals

Make sure you understand how your job contributes to your company's business objectives. Are you in a revenue-generating role? A brand-awareness role? Is your mission to delight the customer? Knowing how your job fits into the big picture will give you inspiration and a sense of accomplishment -- and will help you understand your job's impact.

Be Ethical

Bring integrity to your job. Whether you're running the company or cleaning its bathrooms, be honest in all you do. Don't call in sick just to get a day off -- that's stealing. Put in an honest day's work. Be accountable. If you're working remotely, be sure you are. Do what you say you're going to do. Honesty and reliability mean a lot to your manager.

Stay Fit

OK, this was probably on your last New Year's resolutions list, but that's because it's so important. Try to break a sweat for 20 minutes, three days a week. Go for a walk at lunch. Join a gym. Lift weights. A healthy body makes a healthy mind. Exercising increases blood flow to the brain and gives you ideas. You'll be more productive at work, and best of all, you'll feel better.

Stretch Your Role

Occasionally think how you can go above and beyond. Are there projects outside your defined role you could help with? Be proactive; ask to join. Come up with your own ideas, and work with your manager to implement them. If you're a hamster, step off the wheel and poke your head out of the cage. Stretch a little. This won't go unnoticed.

Manage Up

Make sure you and your manager are in firm agreement on what you're doing. Be proactive and get on his calendar to ensure you're meeting or exceeding expectations. Don't assume he's paying close attention. There are bad managers. If there's a disconnect between what you're doing and what your manager wants, you're partly to blame. Don't wait until review time.

Manage Across

Even if you work primarily alone, be sure to make time to understand your peers' roles and how they go about their jobs. Show an interest. Don't just choose a few friends and become part of a clique. High school is over. You never know when you may need people -- or be reporting to them.


Don't leave people waiting for answers. If you're in an email environment, return emails promptly. Let people know what you're doing. If you're working on a project, always ask yourself who needs to know about it, then tell them. Talk to people; give them a heads up. And when someone helps you out, be sure to thank him. It's amazing this even needs to be on a list, but bad communicators abound. Don't be one of them.

Make Time for Play

Have fun. Work hard, but smile while you're doing it. No one likes a grump. Approach each day with a positive spirit and stay loose. Enjoy your family and friends as well. Make time for them -- and you. It's called work/life balance. All work and no play makes life a chore.